Robert Ivy: Architect and CEO of the American Institute of Architects

If you’re curious about Robert Ivy, he is an architect, Executive Vice President, and Chief Executive Officer of the renowned American Institute of Architects, based in Washington, D.C. He is also the Founder of AIA Continental Europe, the European branch of the American Institute of Architects, one of the institute’s seven international chapters. Ivy has worked in the architectural field for over four decades; he is a University of the South alumnus, who earned a B.A. in English, in 1969, before going on to study at Tulane University, earning a Master’s degree in architecture, in 1976. In his role as architect and CEO of the American Institute of Architects, Ivy is tasked with managing the institute’s network of 250 chapters and over 90,000 members.

Although he has only been with the American Institute of Architects since 2011, Ivy possesses a wealth of industry experience. In 1996, he began his career as an Editor-in-Chief for the Architectural Record, an American monthly magazine predicated on architecture and interior design. During his time with the Architectural Record, Ivy’s contributions were met with considerable praise, earning him the premier magazine journalism award. Soon after, Ivy took on the role of Vice President and Editorial Director for McGraw-Hill Construction Media, which published written works for the Architectural Record, as well as GreenSource and the Engineering News-Record. In addition, Robert Ivy served as a principal for Ivy Architects, as well as managing partner for Dean, Dale, Dean & Ivy, a comprehensive architectural firm based in Mississippi. Learn more about Robert Ivy at Steel Institute of New York

When it comes to being the recipient of awards, Robert Ivy has received his fair share; in fact, he was named Master Architect, by the national architecture fraternity, Alpha Rho Chi, for his capacity to effectively communicate the value of architectural design. Not only was it an honor to be recognized by the fraternity, the recognition placed him in the company of famed architects like John Wellborn Root and Nathan Ricker, who were also recognized for their contributions to architecture. Also, while still at the Architecture Record, Ivy, and the publication as a whole received the American Society of Magazine Editors National Magazine Award.

Although Robert Ivy is immensely successful in his field, he doesn’t mind helping others; in fact, he contributed to Frank Gehry’s success. Ivy played an integral role in selecting Gehry to design the National Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial. So needless to say, Robert Ivy is well suited for his role with the American Institute of Architects.

Check:https://dirt.asla.org/2011/06/22/robert-ivy-on-the-future-of-architecture/

 

The American Institute of Architects Makes Architecture Into an Engine For a Better World

Robert Ivy acts as the chief executive officer as well as the executive vice president for the American Institute of Architects. The American Institute of Architects is a professional organization with a strong focus on bringing together architects from around the world. While Ivy works as an architect, putting a focus on the design and construction industries, he strongly encourages architects to look outside their own field. Architecture isn’t an isolated field, and with applications from improving public health to disaster relief efforts, collaboration has become the name of the game, and the American Institute of Architects is ahead of the pack when it comes to making collaboration happen. View Robert Ivy’s profile at LinkedIn

Why The Recent Focus on Public Health?

The field of architecture is unique in that the field seems to focus on a single theme at any given time. While, until recently, the focus of publications has been on the isolated value of a structure, seeing them simply as objects, there has been a recent trend towards architectural projects being agents of change and collaboration, focusing on the bigger picture, which is to say, how the project affects the entire city and its people. With the new generation of architects focused on social engagement, diversity, collaboration, and more hands-on experiences. The impression of architecture as simply another art form is quickly fading, and its value to society is becoming more clear than ever before.

One area in which architecture has a readily apparent effect is that of public health. While the structure of a building isn’t likely to mend a broken leg, it can be engineered to help prevent things such as non-communicable diseases in the vein of heart disease or diabetes. For example, a building could be designed to promote healthy living and exercise by forgoing things such as elevators in favor of stairs, or, god forbid, by placing the parking spaces further away. But this focus on health is by no means a new development, it has simply gained more traction recently than in the past. The most simple design principles of architecture already force those in the field to consider health, from a building’s access to sunlight and clean water to ventilation and fresh air. Health has been part of architecture since the first time a building was designed. Read:https://www.nytimes.com/topic/organization/american-institute-of-architects

Building For The Future

The final goal of this movement is quite simple, as Ivy explains. Architects want evidence that their buildings are creating an impact on the world. They want to know whether or not their designs affect health or productivity, and this data can be hard to get. Most studies on the subject have focused on lighting rather than structure, and data is sparse. Robert Ivy believes that a sustained effort is what’s needed to gather this data and to turn the field of architecture into a force for change, and an engine for collaboration.

Read the article at zdnet.com about Robert Ivy

 

The Birth of the American Institute of Architects

Founded in New York City by a group of thirteen architects in 1857, the American Institute of Architects was meant for the promotion of the scientific and practical side of the architectural profession as well as to prove the professionalism of its members, elevating their social standing in the community. Anyone who wanted to claim to be an architect could do so in the times preceding the founding of the American Institute for Architects, because in the United States at that time there were no architectural schools or licensing laws.

The American Institute for Architects has its headquarters in Washington D.C. The AIA is all about giving support to architects as well as elaborating on the public’s image of the architectural profession. Providing educational resources, governmental advocates, community reinforcement and a public outreach.

As with any newly formed organization, it was necessary for a constitution and by-laws to be drawn up in which named the organization the New York Society of Architects. Only after a recommendation by Thomas U. Walter, a former president (1877-1887), did it become the American Institute for Architects. The founding members signed the constitution and new by-laws on April 15, 1957.

In the mid-1960s AIA held a design contest in search of an architect to design the new headquarters; Mitchell/Giurgola won that contest, however it would all come to naught when he was unable to get an endorsement of his design by the United States Commission of Fine Arts. It was then decided that “The Architects Collaborative” (TAC) would re-design the new building. Two of the TAC principals, Norman Fletcher and Howard Elkus led this design team in which a new building would be completed in 1973. The 150th anniversary celebration in 2007 would once again rename the building to the “American Center for Architecture” making it the new home to the American Institute of Architecture students, The Association of Collegiate Architecture Students, and the National Architectural Accrediting Board.

.Robert Ivy was named the Chief Executive Officer of the American Institute for Architecture in 2011, in which he is also the Executive Vice-President. Robert Ivy earned his Masters of Architecture from Tulane University as well as his Bachelor of Arts (cum laude) majoring in English from Sewanee: The University of the South.

His career began when he was selected in 1996 to become the Editor-in-Chief of Architectural Record in which under his guidance grew to be one of the most read journals in the world. He also became Vice-President and Editorial Director of “McGraw-Hill Construction Media.” He was also a part of the panel in which made the selection of architect, Frank Gehry to design the National Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial.

With his education and career history, it seems fitting that Robert Ivy be named current CEO of the American Institute for Architecture. Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/topic/organization/american-institute-of-architects